Optimus Crux Stove ($55)

Table of Contents

Canister

2.9 oz.

Compact design and quiet operation.

Heavier and more expensive than the PocketRocket 2.

There’s no shortage of top-quality stoves that can be found in canisters (including those like the MSR PocketRocket 2 and Soto WindMaster above) And Optimus is throwing their hat into the competition using Crux. Crux here. It stands out from other models with its compactand foldable design that fits in the inside of the fuel canister using the included neoprene bags. It’s difficult to find a lighter-weight stove that doesn’t require you to look into alternative fuel models, which makes the Crux an ideal choice for those who aren’t looking to sacrifice quality. In addition to its compact size the Optimus ticks all the boxes to be a top-quality canister stove with an impressive boil time of 3 minutes as well as a great flame control and a simple, user-friendly interface.

With only a slight price and weight distinction (the MSR lowers the bar by 0.3 1 oz. and the price is $5) it could seem that we’re splitting hairs comparison between two devices, the PocketRocket 2 and Crux, however, a few minor differences could make a huge difference to the more discerning user. The Crux’s flame is significantly larger (better to cook with) and also more quiet than MSR. But the PocketRocket is perhaps the more durable option having a harder-sided case and less moving components (no adjustable stem that folds). In terms of wind performance, neither is as good as that of the Soto WindMaster above (the Optimus convex burner is the one that has a convex shape, which means the flame is much more visible). It’s difficult to be wrong with these canister stoves, but based on what you need you may find one that gets the job done a bit better than others.